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Posts Tagged ‘Wildlife Rehab Fundraiser’

I am absolutely heartbroken. I hiked out of the Grand Canyon last week to find out that Wildlife Rehabilitation Northwest Tucson had a fire while I was away. Other volunteers have put together a fundraising effort to help rebuild the facility. Please donate and share this campaign at https://www.generosity.com/animal-pet-fundraising/help-wildlife-rehab-of-nw-tucson-recover-rebuild–2.
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Aftermath of the fire outside – photo by Chris Bondante

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The bird room after the fire – Photo by Chris Bondante

Our bird room and adjacent outdoor habitats were completely destroyed, along with food, equipment, and other items. The good news is that 86-year old owner Janet Miller is OK and most animals survived and are receiving continued care. Some of the birds lost had been educational animals for over a decade, they will all be missed.

Elfie and Cleo

Both of our educational Elf Owls perished in the fire. Elfie and Cleo brought joy and wonder to all who met them.

Please give what you can, and please continue to share this campaign. This is a kick off that will help us reach short term goals: resuming very limited intake, replacing supplies and equipment that were destroyed by the fire, and continuing care of the many birds and mammals that were unharmed by the fire. Stay tuned for more crowd funding campaigns and fundraising events in Tucson and beyond.  And thank you all so much for supporting this very important work!

Luna and Baby Great Horned Owl

Luna the one-eyed Great Horned Owl was a great surrogate and raised many baby owls so that they could go on to be released.

Baby Great Horned Owls

Baby Great Horned Owls

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Barn Owl that we had been doing physical therapy with to help regain the use of its legs was also sadly lost in the fire.

The Wildlife Rehab receives no public funding and is paid for by Janet herself. Funds will go toward food, medicine, medical supplies, carriers, equipment, and reconstruction. Your support means that we can continue helping wild birds and small mammals recover from injury, illness and orphanhood.

Harris Hawk

Harris Hawk

Baby Bunnies

Thankfully the baby bunnies were in another room and we did not lose any of them.

Here’s a wonderful video done in 2015 by Tony Paniagua at Arizona Public Media to learn more about Janet Miller and the work she has done running the wildlife rehab for over 20 years. Thank you for your caring and generosity. Click here to donate and share.

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A different perspective on the ridgeline and Prominent Point

The Prominent Point Ridgeline as viewed from Tucson, the Thumb is visible to the right of the telephone pole

From January 1st- April 30th, the Bighorn Sheep Management Area of the Pusch Ridge Wilderness is off-limits to off-trail travel. I can’t say enough about how much I enjoy off-trail travel. It opens up a world of possibilities and I like the challenge of route-finding.

I wanted to make the last day of the year count and chose Prominent Point as my hike for December 31st . I had been doing some research on different ways to summit, but chose the Pima Canyon approach for my first attempt.

Bill and I started hiking around 7:30 am. The HikeArizona.com description says that the turnoff into the canyon is about 1.6 miles in, it is actually more like 2 miles. The entry is across the creek from the big slabs that I took to Table Mountain last year. There is a nice cairned route that pretty much stays in the canyon bottom. Rosewood Point looms above, but not for long.

Bill in the drainage

Bill in the drainage

We stopped to take a break and noticed that we were at the junction where you go to the right for Rosewood Point. We followed another cairn for the route that curved to the left. The canyon bottom here was pretty open and we had several sections of big slabs to walk up. It got steeper, but didn’t require any scrambling.

Rising above Rosewood Point

Rising above Rosewood Point

We had to ascend toward a saddle with a cliff on the left. No longer on a route, we shot straight up the hill. Big rocks came loose from the soil below and shindagger threatened every step. This was the worst footing of the day, both up and down.

Steep!

Steep!

We reached the saddle and saw our next big climb past the Thumb to the ridgeline. There were great views into Pima Canyon of the Pusch Ridge peaks. Sadly, for all our climbing, we were not yet above Pusch Peak.

Pusch Peak

Pusch Peak

Table Mountain

Table Mountain

The Thumb looms above

The Thumb looms above

Up until now, we’d been in the shade of the canyon. It was surprisingly hot for the last day of the year. There was a pretty good route heading toward the Thumb- what an impressive slab of rock! Finally we reached the ridgeline and the views were incredible. It was pretty easy walking for most of the ridgeline, just a few small scrambles where it narrowed down near the drainages.

Prominent Point west ridgeline

Prominent Point west ridgeline

Backdrop of the sheer cliffs of the Table

Backdrop of the sheer cliffs of the Table

The summit loomed ahead, the final slope steep and unrelenting especially after a long day of uphill. Patches of snow appeared and below the summit I found several large pottery sherds. I would imagine this peak would make a good lookout, given its prominence.

Getting closer...

Getting closer…

Pottery sherds near the summit

Pottery sherds near the summit

We reached the small maze of rocks that make up the Western summit and made a snowman. We posed on top with our New Year’s accoutrements.

Happy New Year!

Happy New Year!

Micro Chicken in the snow

Micro Chicken in the snow

Atop the summit jar spot

Atop the summit jar spot

The summit has fantastic views in every direction, too many peaks to name visible. A peregrine falcon flew overhead- what a great way to spend the last day of the year!

Prominent Point East Summit, Mt. Kimball and Little Kimball

Prominent Point East Summit, Mt. Kimball and Little Kimball

We started down the mountain around 1:30 and made our way along the ridgeline. Now that I’ve done this way, I’d like to summit via one of the other routes. Cowgill and Glendening say that the most direct route is the gully that comes off the summit into Finger Rock Canyon, and there are ways to get to it via the route to the Guard as well. So many interesting options! Too bad they will have to wait until after the summer, at least there are bighorn sheep to warrant the closures now. I won’t go into it here, but there was recently a great article in the Tucson Weekly about the Bighorn reintroduction project:  http://www.tucsonweekly.com/tucson/rebalancing-nature/Content?oid=3941330

Neat view of Pusch Ridge, Picacho, Newman

Neat view of Pusch Ridge, Picacho, Newman

The Thumb

The Thumb

The lighting was spectacular on our way down. We managed to be on a route for most of the time which sped progress over straight bushwhacking. Still, the slope from the cliffs to the bottom of the canyon bend was really loose and unpleasant.

So many poky things

So many poky things

It eased up considerably once we got back down to the streambed. We took a break once we hit the shade, right before the side canyon curved back toward Pima Canyon. It is amazing how quiet and remote it feels back there, even though all that is between you and Tucson is Rosewood Point.

The Pima Canyon Trail seemed like it dragged on forever as usual, we saw our first people of the day a mile away from the trailhead. Made it back in time to watch the sunset light on Prominent Point. It doesn’t look as far away from the trailhead, because the long ridge is foreshortened.

Cottonwood in Pima Canyon

Cottonwood in Pima Canyon

Sunset on Prominent Point to top off the last day of the year

Sunset on Prominent Point to top off the last day of the year

Although it was a great hike, Bill and I agreed that it would have been even better with Wendy along. She’s been nursing a bum Achilles tendon-  hope she heals up soon so she can join me on bushwhacking adventures again in the new year.

Overall, the terrain and the route was easier than I had expected. It’s a long day, but the views are totally worth the collection of scratches you’ll amass hiking to Prominent Point.

In Wildlife Rehabilitation news, I’m trying to get in as many shifts as I can before I leave for my thru-hike of the Arizona Trail on March 14th. We’ve got quite a few interesting characters at Wildlife Rehabilitation Northwest Tucson, including three Peregrine Falcons. This one we’ve had for a while will eat from the fist. So I get to go into the cage with a plate of food, offer up my arm, and it hops on and I let the Peregrine eat from the plate in my hand. What a magical experience to be able to work so closely with the world’s fastest bird.
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Peregrine Falcon

Peregrine Falcon

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Looking down on Lee's Ferry at the top of the Spencer Trail

Looking down on Lee’s Ferry at the top of the Spencer Trail

I travel quite a bit for my job with the Arizona Trail Association, visiting the Gateway Communities for events, presentations, and meetings. I was in Page representing the ATA at the Balloon Regatta festival the first weekend of November and my friend Rob took me for a fantastic hike.

We drove over the Glen Canyon bridge and turned on a dirt road that we parked off of to begin our trek. Ten miles to Lee’s Ferry, off-trail until the last two miles on the Spencer Trail. It was just getting light out and we hiked along the deep sandy two-track for a short time before setting off onto sandstone slabs. Seeking Sandstone was the theme of the day, much easier to hike on than sand.

Seeking Sandstone

Seeking Sandstone

Vermilion Cliffs at sunrise

Vermilion Cliffs at sunrise

We reached a survey marker, our first objective, about 45 minutes into the hike. We crossed a large sandstone bowl and ended up at the upper end of Ferry Swale Canyon. There was a scramble down into the sandy wash, and then we took a sandstone ridge steeply out of it and into the Valley of Moqui Marbles.

Survey Marker

Survey Marker

Sandstone

Route crosses the wash and goes on the ridge in between the two canyons

Route crosses the wash and goes on the ridge in between the two canyons

Up the ridge

Up the ridge

The Moqui Marbles started out small, the size of peas. They were nestled in the striations of sandstone, dark and round. Then larger ones appeared, then sparkly ones, then a valley of massive marbles. It was so wonderful, I couldn’t stop taking pictures.

Embedded Moqui marbles

Embedded Moqui marbles

So amazing!

So amazing!

Sparkly!

Sparkly!

Marvelous Moqui valley

Marvelous Moqui valley

Gigantic!

Gigantic!

Rob is way ahead because I can't stop taking pictures of this incredible valley

Rob is way ahead because I can’t stop taking pictures of this incredible valley

After the Marvelous Moqui Valley, we had a short slot canyon to climb up to get on the mesa top, headed toward one of the junipers that we’d seen on the horizon from way back. There were balloons launching from Page for the Balloon Regatta festivities that go on all weekend.

Small slot on the way to the mesa top

Small slot on the way to the mesa top

Crocodile rock

Crocodile rock

Balloons

Balloons

We hiked across the mesa top toward a sandstone formation with three humps and the Echo Cliffs came into view. All of a sudden, there was a set of large, curled bighorn sheep horns lying on the sandstone with a jawbone.

Look- I'm a bighorn!

Look- I’m a bighorn!

After going to the right of the formation, we finally started coming upon remnants of trail here and there. Rob took me over to a spectacular view of the Colorado River and Waterholes Canyon in the distance.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

We will connect with the Spencer Trail  on the ridge

We will connect with the Spencer Trail on the ridge

Amazing overlook of the Colorado River

Amazing overlook of the Colorado River

A short distance from the overlook, we reached the top of the Spencer Trail and I was wowed once again by the jaw-dropping view. The area around Lee’s Ferry is a geological wonder, and we had a long break, looking at the Echo and Vermilion Cliffs, and the start of the Grand Canyon winding below with the sweet sound of the Paria riffle. Rob pointed out different routes he’d done and I wished I had another week to explore the area.

Panorama from top of Spencer Trail- click to enlarge

Panorama from top of Spencer Trail- Echo Cliffs, Colorado River, Marble Canyon, Lee’s Ferry Vermilion Cliffs, Paria River- click to enlarge

Too soon it was time to drop 1500 feet in two miles on the Spencer Trail. I have looked up at the cliff many times from below at the ferry, trying to discern any part of the route, but never could see where it went. The trail is made up largely of steep steps covered in sand. It got us down quickly and before we knew it, we were back at the parking lot.

Steeply down the sandy steps of the Spencer Trail

Steeply down the sandy steps of the Spencer Trail

Echo Cliffs

Echo Cliffs

Ferry!

Ferry!

The launch area was empty, what a difference from the crowded frenzy of commercial river season. Another difference is that it was not incredibly hot out, as it usually is when we’re rigging and launching our boats at the ferry in the summertime. Rob’s friend Burl was at the ferry with cold drinks to deliver us back to Page. First time on the new Hwy 89 bypass during the day and I was surprised at how scenic of a drive it was. What a great hike, I’d definitely be up for this one again anytime.

In Wildlife Rehab news, I released a couple of the “Fuzzball” baby Great Horned Owls from the last entry near the San Pedro River. Such a treat to see the young ones go into the wild Donate to Wildlife Rehabilitation Northwest Tucson and help to defray the costs of raising fuzzballs!

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If they don't fly out, take apart the carrier and wait.

If they don’t fly out, take apart the carrier and wait.

And wait...

And wait…

Just before flying into the cottonwood

Just before flying into the cottonwood

 #2 Sat with its head poked out like that for a while

#2 Sat with its head poked out like that for a while

Out in the world but not quite sure what to do

Out in the world but not quite sure what to do

Not the soaring flight I'd hoped for, but it'll do. Good luck little owls!

Not the soaring flight I’d hoped for, but it’ll do. Good luck little owls!

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Birds Blues and Bellydance 2013

Birds Blues and Bellydance 2013

The past month has been an excellent one for backpacking and I’ve been lucky enough to have hiked from South Kaibab to Hermit in the Grand Canyon, the Alamo and Gila River Canyons passages of the Arizona Trail in full wildflowers, and a three day tour of the Rincons that included a trek to Rincon Peak, the little-used Rincon Creek Trail, and the new Quilter Trail/Arizona Trail in Saguaro National Park. Unfortunately all this backpacking has left me little time to update the blog.  I promise I’ll have one of the above trips up soon!

Looking down Monument Creek

Looking down Monument Creek

Gila River Canyons Wildflowers

Gila River Canyons Wildflowers

View South from Rincon Peak

View South from Rincon Peak

Spring is definitely in full swing, and it’s time for the third annual Birds, Blues, and Bellydance Benefit for Wildlife Rehabilitation this Saturday, April 20th from 7-10 pm at Sky Bar- 536 N 4th Ave.

Citan the Harris Hawk

Citan the Harris Hawk

There will be a Harris Hawk, an Elf Owl, and a Great Horned Owl from 7:30-8:30, funky blues courtesy of The Railbirdz, bellydance performances from Troupe HipNautic, Brandye Asya and others, and open dance toward the end of the evening with Ensemble Al-Salam.

Troupe HipNautic- from the left: Tama, Raja, Zahyra, Marjani, and Krishana

Troupe HipNautic- from the left: Tama, Raja, Zahyra, Marjani, and Krishana

The Railbirdz -photo by Mike Bieke

The Railbirdz -photo by Mike Bieke

100% of the $7 suggested donation plus 15% of sales at Brooklyn Pizza go toward food, housing and supplies for the birds and small mammals at the rehab, so come on out and have a beer and a pizza while helping a worthy cause!

Here’s the Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/586386804712314/

Hope to see you there!

If you can’t make the event, but would still like to donate, click the button below to donate securely via PayPal or send an old-fashioned check made out to Wildlife Rehabilitation Northwest Tucson to Pima Federal Credit Union P.O. Box 50267 Tucson, Arizona 85703.

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Incredible Maples along Ash Creek

Well, this hike really does live up to the hype. I was supposed to go to the Canyon this weekend, but changed my plans because of the storm forecast. After seeing all the pictures posted last weekend, I decided the time had come to make the trek out to Ash Creek for some fall colors and summit Bassett Peak. My friend Cindy said that there was water about 2 miles in near some red maples, so I decided to make it an overnighter.

On November 7th, I didn’t start hiking until 2:30, only wanted to go two miles anyway. The drive in was pretty and I was excited about seeing a new Sky Island. Scattered maples began to appear, then giddy-inducing larger patches. I don’t know what it is about vibrant colors in the wild, they make me deeply happy.

I saw only two people the whole two days, they were hiking out and I asked them if they’d seen any water on the trail. I got a little less than two miles in and there was another roadbed that split off to the right with more of the black tubing I’d seen on the trail. The tank was a little ways down on the split, dripping and full of clear water.I chose a campsite in the colorful maples along the trail. The area was unfortunately outside the wilderness area and cattle-bombed. I’ve spent enough time in cattle country to just deal with it, move the larger patties aside and settle in. I had a relaxing evening by the fire with my journal.

Camping in the maples

In the morning, it was overcast and a lot warmer than I had expected. I continued hiking along the drainage. The maples are such a delight! Such a range of colors. I passed another tank with clear water along the way. I thought to myself, “This is such a great hike, but what it could really use is a tunnel of maples.” And then I crossed the wilderness boundary and got exactly what I wanted. A tunnel of multi-hued maples.

The Maple Tunnel

I reached the small grove of aspen and started up the switchbacks. It is so neat to be able to look down on the multicolored drainage as you gain elevation. I was pleasantly surprised by the interesting volcanic landscape of the ridgeline, I guess the only pictures I’d really looked at were of foliage, not the rest of the hike. The skies had cleared and the views upon reaching the ridgeline were incredible.

Bassett Peak and the colorful drainage below

Volcanic ridgeline

Rincons and Catalinas

The volcanic ridgeline begs for a return trip in both directions. The trail switchbacked up Bassett Peak and there was a short steep route the rest of the way to the peak. One of the reasons I like backpacking is that it gives me more time to spend on top of peaks. I love standing on top of one Sky Island looking at the other ones.

Summit of Bassett Peak

Pinalenos

Interior of the Galiuros

Winchester Mountains to the south

I hiked back down to the aspen grove and relished another run through the maple tunnel. Reached my campsite, grabbed my stuff and shot a million more pictures. What a great hike!!

Looking down at the aspen and switchbacks

Aspen and Maples

Such a beautiful place!

As I was driving out on Ash Creek Rd., I saw a bunch of horses hanging out on one side of the road near a fence. I got out to take pictures of them with the Pinalenos in the background. When I approached, all the horses, including a couple super-cute little ones scattered away from the fence. I stood near the fence and soon almost all of them came over to see me. I love giving massages to horses, and one by one, they hung their necks over the fence so that I could rub them. I must have been there for a half-hour, it was fantastic. One mom and her baby watched me from a distance. What a treat! I eventually had to tear myself away from the horses, but a little farther down the road another group of horses ran across the road right in front of my car! Such a great way to end a perfect couple of days.

Horses waiting their turn for massage

Mom and baby kept their distance

I love horses!

Free-running horses

In Wildlife Rehabilitation Fundraiser news, food prices have jumped recently.  Wildlife Rehabilitation in Northwest Tucson depends on donations to function, so if you’ve been waiting to donate, now is a great time! Click the button to donate securely via PayPal.

Baby Great Horned Owls

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View toward Patagonia from Josephine Peak

I am now back from working on the river this summer and transitioning to a land-based lifestyle. It may take a while, however- the other night it was storming and I woke up worrying about if everything on the boat was covered. I did six commercial trips this summer with Arizona River Runners and Grand Canyon Whitewater. It was amazing and I learned so much about the Grand Canyon and boating. Then at the end of my season, I was invited last-minute on a private 8-day trip on the lower half of the river just for fun. I’ll write about that in an upcoming entry.

As much as I love the Grand Canyon, I missed Tucson- every time I came back from a trip the mountains were more and more green. I didn’t have the time (or quite frankly the energy) to do any hikes around here this summer, so I was excited to get out in my own neck of the woods for a change. You know the place you live is pretty when you miss it while at the Grand Canyon!

Santa Rita Panorama- click to enlarge

I called Wendy to see if she wanted to go to the Santa Ritas, but it turned out she’d already made plans with Cindy and her friend Bobby to do Josephine Peak, so I got to tag along. This was a great destination that I probably wouldn’t have thought of, as it is off the Super Trail and I always take Baldy up the mountain.

Josephine Canyon

We had perfect weather, big fluffy clouds with a couple of sprinkles just before we had the final push to the peak. The Ritas are super-lush with wildflowers everywhere. We took Baldy to Josephine Saddle, then the Super Trail to Riley Saddle and the turnoff for the Josephine Peak “Trail”. I really enjoyed the open views and easy grade on the Super Trail.

Our objective comes into view

A parade of Chrome Domes

We hit the peak turnoff and then the fun immediately began. Cairn-hunting, log-hopping, side-hilling, and brush fighting. Some of us were more successful than others at the brush fighting and a certain person who I hike with often had an up-close and personal encounter. Friendship is plucking pricklies from a posterior that isn’t yours…

Wendy comes through the downed trees and mini-pines

Just a little brushy…

Rincons in the distance

We went up along the ridge that goes from Riley Saddle for a bit and then had to sidehill toward another ridge that led to the summit. After we reached the summit ridge, the tread became more apparent and switchbacked steeply up toward the summit. The summit had fantastic views of Wrightson to the north and I could see the path of the Arizona Trail below. Cindy had her celebratory beer and I got out Micro Chicken for his summit shot.

Hiking up the final ridge, there were switchbacks among the downed logs

Wrightson, Bobby, Cindy, and me

Video from the summit:

Micro Chicken bags another summit

After the enjoyment at the summit, it was time to fight the brush again back down to the Super Trail.

Cool tree courtesy of the 2005 Florida Fire

Log-hopping and sidehilling through brush (also courtesy of the Florida Fire)

Looking back at the summit ridge of Josephine Peak

Glad to be back in the Ritas!

Aaah, back to the big, fancy trail.

We were elated at the wide tread and log-free Super Trail and Cindy turned into Downhill Turbo Cindy.  At Josephine Saddle we decided to take the Super Trail to the Roger’s Rock/Pipeline route because Wendy hadn’t seen it before. It was gorgeous, with running water and changing sycamore trees. Spent the whole day on the mountain and topped it off with ice cream on the way home. I don’t think days get much better than that.

Through the flowers on the Super Trail with Hopkins on the left

Mountain Spiny Lizard

Beautiful sycamores and running water on the Roger’s Rock Route

I am also back volunteering at Wildlife Rehabilitation Northwest Tucson, I missed my birds and other critters!
I had a memorable encounter the other day when a Harris Hawk jumped onto my back while I was cleaning its cage. Normally this would not be a good thing, but this particular hawk was raised for a month in someone’s bathtub when it was very little. It has been around people its whole life. After a bit, it made itself comfortable on top of my head! It’s good to be back.

100% of donations go toward housing and feeding the animals at the rehab:

Silly Harris Hawk!

Harris Hawk Head

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Reflections in the Black Pool

I needed to get away for a solo overnighter to relax before the frenzy of the river season starts. This summer, I will be working with Arizona River Runners and Grand Canyon Whitewater on the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon! I thought about the Black Pool in Horse Camp Canyon and my floatie that has been put away all winter and my decision was made. I always enjoy the drive up 77, the views of the north side of the Catalinas and then along the Galiuros.

Started hiking around 10:30, and it was already pretty warm. Never a problem with Aravaipa’s cooling waters. I was pleased to see that it was still the season for poppies in the canyon. Wildflowers and cactus blooms- it only makes it all the more beautiful. I noticed immediately that the creek had quite a bit of algae in it. I hoped that the pool I wanted to float in would be clear. I had that happen once- came all ready to float only to find the pool a mucky green mess.

Datura on the verge of blooming

Sacred Datura Bloom

Thistle

I saw a Zone-Tailed and a Red-Tailed Hawk and a Great Blue Heron as I hiked along. Picked all the right paths to move speedily to Horse Camp. Ran into a couple of groups of dayhikers and backpackers hiking out, but no one else until the next afternoon. I turned into Horse Camp Canyon and was sad to see tons of algae in there too. The creek was very green and lush with columbine and grasses. Upon  reaching the Black Pool I was elated to see that it was perfectly clear! What’s more is the waterfall was almost completely obscured by red and yellow wildflowers. What a treat! I blew up my trusty green floatie and floated away the afternoon. The temperature of the water was perfect- warm on top, but much cooler below. I always wonder how deep it is, but I’m not about to dive down and find out.

Great Blue Heron

Small arch in the walls

The Black Pool

When the sun went behind the canyon wall, I moved over to the popular campsite opposite Horse Camp Canyon to finish re-reading The Monkey Wrench Gang and write in my journal. As it got darker out, the mosquitoes appeared and I decided to try camping on the wide expanse of bare rock on the other side of the creek. Much better views and surprisingly few mosquitoes. The moon was large and bright and I had an enjoyable evening. The mesquite bosque is nice during the day for shade, but I always prefer a spot with wider views.

Camp next to Horse Camp Canyon

Messing around with self-portraits, I got this strange and interesting shot

The next morning, I read Katie Lee’s All My Rivers Are Gone about Glen Canyon while waiting for it to warm up. Once the sun hit my sleep spot, I headed back into Horse Camp Canyon to float and read some more. It was so nice to be able to have two days to myself to relax. I used my umbrella with my floatie for shade, but the pool wasn’t big enough to ride the breezes like I did last year:

Relaxing in the morning

They call Aravaipa “The Grand Canyon of the Sonoran Desert” because of its layers and the water running through it. It certainly reminds me of a mini-Grand Canyon and made me completely excited for next week when I’ll be starting my dream job on the river. I will be sleeping on beaches with the sound of the river all summer long and I can hardly wait. I hiked out in the afternoon and as soon as I returned to the main stream, I saw a woman with a reflective umbrella similar to mine. We exchanged stories of guys thinking they are funny when they say “no forecast for rain today, heh heh…” as they pass by.  The hike back to the trailhead was enjoyable and I bid beautiful Aravaipa good-bye until the next time.

In Wildlife Rehabilitation Fundraiser news, cute baby birds, bunnies, and squirrels abound.  I feel so fortunate to be able to see them grow up and be released.

Handful of 5-day old baby bunnies

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