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Alamo Canyon Trail Work

Alamo Canyon Trail Work

It takes a lot of work to maintain 800 miles of trail from Mexico to Utah!

The Arizona Trail is split into 43 passages, which are then subdivided into about 100 segments. Each segment has a trail steward- a person or organization that adopts the segment of trail and is responsible for answering questions about trail conditions and holding periodic work events. I am proud to be the steward of #16c- 5.5 miles that wind along the Gila River. Last weekend I helped my backpacking bestie Wendy on a work event on her segment, which is 7.5 miles south of Picketpost Trailhead near Superior.

ATA Tool Trailer

ATA Tool Trailer

I was excited to be able to do some trail maintenance for a change- I am so busy these days promoting the AZT that I don’t get dirty as often as I used to!

Wendy, India and I drove up to Superior in the AZTmobile and loaded it up with tools and water for the weekend. Dropped Wendy off so she could meet with the hikers that were coming in at night. After getting Los Hermanos to go, we headed to FR 4, Telegraph Canyon Road. I had heard stories about how bad the road was and it lived up to its reputation. Had a run-in with a rock that made the back bumper unhappy . The worst part of the road is the Fissure of Death, where a big part of the road is gone and you have to go up on the hillside, the whole truck tilting toward the FOD.

Picketpost Mountain from FR 4

Picketpost Mountain from FR 4

We made it to the campsite and watched a spectacular sunset and situated ourselves in a spot to catch the backpackers that were coming in. One of the crew, Marcos, came in on a mountain bike. This passage is also part of the Grand Enchantment Trail that goes from Phoenix to Albuquerque, so you get a long distance hiking twofer.

Classic AZ sunset Friday night

Classic AZ sunset Friday night

The group settled in and got their camps set up on a flat area a short distance from the trail on a side road off FR4. Some of the group had LED lights and we had an LED campfire and chatted while waiting for Wendy and her two hikers to get there. We could see the saddle and watched for Wendy’s light- finally at 10 pm we saw it and I could relax knowing that all had made it to camp safely. The only downside to camp was the amount of broken glass. I slept in the AZTmobile.

The morning was dewy and after breakfast we split up into three groups to work the trail. We had so many people that my group was able to work the next segment north of Wendy’s. It was a perfect day for trail work and we took revenge on many catclaw and other thorny plants. The rains of the summer had washed out several portions and we repaired the tread.

Breakfast at camp

Breakfast at camp

Crew was larger than expected, so some  of us worked north to the first saddle on  #17b

Crew was larger than expected, so some of us worked north to the first saddle on #17b

Hikers coming up the trail

Hikers coming up the trail

The only hikers we saw all day were a couple that were going to be doing a work event on the trail next weekend. There were quite a few bikes- there was a race called the Picketpost Punisher going on that had a 50-mile and an 81-mile loop that crossed our work area. The last guy that finished the 81 miler didn’t finish until 1:30 in the morning! Read John’s blog to hear the story of his 20-hour ride!

FR 4 and our camp below

FR 4 and our camp below

Standing aside for mountain bikers

Standing aside for mountain bikers

Tarantula

Tarantula

Bikepackers

Bikepackers

A full day of trailwork got our appetite going and we returned to camp to find Wendy at the tail end of producing an incredible fajita feast! Wendy’s cooking never disappoints and we all gorged ourselves on the tasty meal.

Saturday night on the trail

Saturday night on the trail

Queen of the Campsite

Queen of the Campsite

Wendy's fajita spread was delicious!

Wendy’s fajita spread was delicious!

We sat around the fire, telling stories, making s’mores and passing Mango Tango around. Wendy graced us with some Irish ballads- it’s always such a treat to hear her beautiful voice. It was around 10:30 when two bikers from the race came into view and it was fun to cheer them on from our camp!

The next morning, the sky looked moody and ominous, but it was an empty threat and cleared up by the time we were ready to pack up and leave. We finished off the last of the trimming and tread work and the backpackers left to hike back to the trailhead.

Washout

Washout

Armoring the washout with rocks

Armoring the washout with rocks

Careful when flipping rocks!

Careful when flipping rocks!

Filling it in

Filling it in

Fixed!

Fixed!

Wendy, India, Stoic (Chris) and I packed up the tools and cached 27 gallons in the wash for public use. Chris was nice enough to do an ingenious fix in the field that included the use of zip ties to hold the droopy back corner up. It worked great for the drive out.

We made it back down the road to Superior without incident and stopped at Old Time Pizza for slices, salad and giant vats of the best iced tea in Kearny. Had a nice visit with Lorraine, who owns the place with her husband Gary- they are true friends of the AZT and avid hikers as well. It was a memorable work event made even better by the amount of work we were able to accomplish. Big kudos to Wendy for her impeccable planning skills!! She also writes a blog, Around the Corner with Wendy– check it out!

Nasty Telegraph Canyon Rd. on the way out

Nasty Telegraph Canyon Rd. on the way out

If you are interested in participating in a work event, check the ATA Calendar for upcoming dates. To find out more about being a part of the Trail Stewardship Program, visit http://www.aztrail.org/steward_information.html

In Wildlife Rehabilitation NW Tucson news, lots of the birds that came to the rehab as babies have been released back into the wild. It’s one of the most rewarding parts of rehab to see them grow up and become self-sufficient.

Donate Button with Credit Cards

Baby Harris Hawk

Baby Harris Hawk

Harris Hawk

Harris Hawk

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A great crew! Sasha the dog, Chris, Steve, Francisco, Al, Rob, David, Tom, Joe, Lee, Max, and Shawn

A great crew! Sasha the dog, Kris, Steve, Francisco, Al, Rob, David, Tom, Joe, Lee, Max, and Shawn

I have been building and maintaining the Arizona Trail with the Arizona Trail Association since 2007. I love being a part of creating and maintaining the trail for generations to come. Several months ago, I became a trail steward for segment 16c and am in charge of maintaining 5.1 miles from Spine Canyon to Walnut Canyon in the Gila River Canyons passage. I chose this passage to adopt for a couple of reasons:

  • I have seen this area covered in wildflowers in the spring and it is amazing, there are also fall colors along the Gila River.
  • I have great memories of my Night on The Spine and the hike I did on Passage 16 & 17 the first three days of the year.
  • I wanted a remote segment that would require overnight trail events.
  • To drive in, you go past the Artesian Well on the old Arizona Trail route, one of my favorite water sources.
  • It is also a part of the Grand Enchantment Trail from Phoenix to Albuquerque- bonus stewardship!

I had my first work event on December 7th & 8th to put in a gate in Walnut Canyon and an OHV barrier about a mile east. Ten of us assembled at Battle Axe Road and AZ 177 and prepared a precarious load on the Bureau of Land Managment (BLM) truck.

We met at Battle Axe Road and loaded up the BLM truck with the gate and the ATV barrier.

We met at Battle Axe Road and loaded up the BLM truck with the gate and the ATV barrier.

The drive out to the site was slow, bumpy and very scenic. We took another road that led down toward the Gila River and arrived in Walnut Canyon just north of the river around lunchtime.

Driving Battle Axe Road with the White Canyon Wilderness in the background

Driving Battle Axe Road with the White Canyon Wilderness in the background

Adjusting the rigging after a couple of miles of the rough road

Adjusting the rigging after a couple of miles of the rough road

We dropped a crew to begin the gate and drove a mile east to the OHV barrier site.  The barrier was an interesting modular design that required no welding in the field. Just a lot of postholes and concrete. Thankfully the BLM provided a power auger and jackhammer. We ran into some caliche that would have taken forever to dig with just a rock bar.

Pieces of the ATV barrier, concrete, and plenty of tools. Rob (in red) is the one who designed and welded the pieces to be assembled in the field.

Pieces of the OHV barrier, concrete, and plenty of tools. Rob (in red) is the one who designed and welded the pieces to be assembled in the field.

Power auger for the holes

Power auger for the holes

Max works the power jackhammer

Max works the jackhammer

Holes are dug and the big barrier piece is in

Holes are dug and the big barrier piece is in

Mixing concrete

Joe and Tom mixing concrete

It had taken a long time to get out to the site, so we worked until the last light getting the gate and barrier set in concrete so that it could cure overnight. The unseasonably mild evening was spent by the fire swapping stories and listening to music courtesy of Max and his guitar.

Continuing to work until the last light is gone

Continuing to work until the last light is gone

Looking north  toward The Spine at sunset

Looking north toward The Spine at sunset

The next day, we finished up the gate and OHV barriers and then constructed a small reroute that helped avoid an unnecessary roadwalk up the canyon and back. We brushed the route back and then built three-foot cairns to lead the way.

Building the reroute

Building the reroute

Chris shows the test of a well-built cairn

Kris shows the test of a well-built cairn

"Laddie-sized" cairns three feet high

“Laddie-sized” cairns three feet high lead the way

Short reroute with new cairns and carsonites

Short reroute with new cairns and carsonites

Here’s the finished gate and OHV barrier:

Finished ATV barrier in the unnamed canyon one mile east of Walnut Canyon

Finished OHV barrier in the unnamed canyon one mile east of Walnut Canyon

Joe, Tom, Chris, Max, Steve, David, Sirena, Shawn, and Lee at the fancy new gate

Joe, Tom, Kris, Max, Steve, David, Sirena, Shawn, and Lee at the fancy new gate

New gate in Walnut Canyon

New gate in Walnut Canyon

I was glad that my work event was a success, most of my crew were from the Crazies and their expertise certainly helped. A big thanks to the BLM and the crew!  Before we could relax, we had the long, slow, bumpy drive back out to AZ 177. This has always been one of my favorite parts of the Arizona Trail and I am excited to be a steward for many years to come. There’s always trailwork to be done, so if you’re interested in volunteering on an event, check out the Arizona Trail Association event calendar.

In Wildlife Rehab news, I have been taking quite a few birds out to test their flight capabilities to see if they are ready for release. It is exhilarating and more than a little scary taking the larger birds. I got a talon to the finger through my gloves this summer and it was extremely painful. I have taken Great Horned Owls, Red Tailed Hawks, Peregrine Falcons, and the other day I took a Turkey Vulture out to see what it could do. Click the button below to donate to Wildlife Rehabilitation Northwest Tucson!

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Birds, Blues and Bellydance Benefit

Only two weeks left until the Birds, Blues, and Bellydance Benefit- hope to see you there! If you can’t make it to the event and would like to donate either by mail or PayPal, click this link. At Wildlife Rehabilitation Northwest Tucson this week, we’ve see a population explosion of baby bunnies, squirrels, songbirds, and this guy, a baby Black-Crowned Night Heron with a particularly fantastic hairdo:

Baby Black-Crowned Night Heron

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For the last two and a half years, every other Thursday I build and maintain the Arizona Trail with the Crazies. Our group used to be called the Summer Crazies, because we are the only Southern Arizona trail crew that works in the summer, no matter how hot it gets. Now, we are just known as the Crazies, because we work year-round building and maintaining the Arizona Trail, no matter what the weather.

Crazies building trail and gates in Las Colinas

One of the best parts of working with the Crazies is that their average age is 65 years old. We have one guy, Larry Schnebly (if you know AZ, yes, he is Sedona Schnebly’s grandson) who celebrated his 80th birthday working with the Crazies. As you can imagine, these guys have some stories to tell, and I love listening to them. Larry once told me about his transition from working in radio to working in  the “new medium” of television in Tucson in the 50’s. Fascinating stuff!

The Craziest Crazie (our leader, Lee Allen), is in his 60’s and thinks nothing of doing a dayhike up into the Rincons with over 4000′ elevation gain or an 18-mile dayhike:

Lee Allen heading for Rincon Creek

One of the other Crazies is Laddie Cox, leader of the Hit-and-Run Crew for the AZT. He was the second-oldest man to complete the 800-mile Arizona Trail, at over 70 years old! I tell you, these guys are inspiring and a testament to the benefits of staying active. You can see me, Laddie, Larry, and the other Crazies in this video from August done by Richard “Grodzo” Grodzicki in true Summer Crazies form at http://www.aztrail.org/reports/event_reports.html#090408

This week, we had a very exciting work event, our first in building a very important connector trail in Saguaro National Park. The hike in and out to the worksite was an adventure in itself. First, we met at Saguaro NP, and piled into 4wd vehicles for the ride to the access point, a rough 4wd off of X-9 Ranch Rd. We shimmied under our first fence, and soon heard Rincon Creek running with all the recent rains. Everyone took their shoes off to ford the chilly creek and the smarter ones brought sandals to avoid the sharp rocks in the streambed.

Fording Rincon Creek

I had some trashbags with me, but didn’t want to work with wet feet all day if they failed, so I took my shoes off for the crossing. Luckily, Lee had reminded everyone to bring something to wipe their feet with after the crossing, which led to this scene:

After the ford

The access to this area is longer than most, we had a 2 1/2 mile hike just to get to the worksite. We walked along an old roadbed towards Hope Camp. As we approached Hope Camp, we saw an Antelope Jackrabbit that was completely calm about 12 people traipsing by. He stayed in plain sight, even rearing up on his hind legs to eat something:

Antelope Jackrabbit

Jackrabbit rearing up on hind legs to eat

Hope Camp

We had to crawl under and over a couple of fences, but soon we were on a very well-flagged route through the desert toward our destination. We bypassed the easy-to-build parts so that an REI crew can come in and work this area on April 3rd. Finally, we reached the start of the trail that the NPS has been building and we were able to work the trail heading back to the south.

New trail appears- photo by Walt Tannert

The National Park Service has been building this connector trail for several weeks now, and I hiked up to see the new trail with my friend Mike Pratt, recently back from working in Afghanistan helping to train the police forces there. The new trail is through beautiful saguaro forests, and after it crosses a beautiful slickrock wash, has very well-built steps that help attain the ridgeline. We stopped to chat with the trail workers, one who was building a “spiral staircase” on the turn of a switchback. The Rincons were still enveloped in clouds, but he said if you looked upcanyon from the spiral staircase there was a really great waterfall in the distance.

Pools in the creek crossing on the brand new trail

Fancy steps put in by the SNP crew

The "Spiral Staircase"

On our way back we saw this unusual saguaro- it looked like a crested saguaro, but the crest was on one of the undersides of the arms instead of at the top.

Crest on a saguaro arm

The trailbuilding was made a lot easier by the dampness of the soil- much easier to dig out the trees and cacti in our trail. We built about 2/10 of a mile of trail today in about 3 hours of work-it may not sound like much, but we will be out there every other Thursday, and the tenths of a mile start to add up pretty quickly.

At noon, we started our hike back toward the vehicles- it’s amazing how much quicker the hike back is than the hike out. Along this stretch of the trail near Hope Camp, there are a lot of purple Santa Rita Prickly Pear cactus, even though we are in the Rincons, not the Santa Ritas!

Hiking back

And then it was back to Rincon Creek for one last ford- I gave my trashbags a try, they got me through with dry feet but definitely don’t work as well in rocky streams. After we forded the creek, it was a short walk back to the vehicles for the customary cookies and soda after working the trail.

Fording Rincon Creek

I can’t wait to go back to this area on the 25th- the clouds only began to clear toward the end of our workday- I bet this area will be even more fantastic with the snow-capped Rincons as a backdrop. If anyone is interested in joining the Crazies for trailbuilding, they can contact Lee Allen at janlee at dakotacom dot net.

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Thank you to everyone who came to my Arizona Trail talk at Summit Hut last night! It was a good turnout and a great audience. I am currently talking to REI in Phoenix about scheduling a talk there. I will post when I have more information.

When I finished the Arizona Trail in May of last year, I was more sad than happy about it. It was such an amazing adventure, that I didn’t want it to end.  Since finishing the trail, I have gone on backpacking trips and dayhikes, but nothing matches the excitement and continuity of hiking a long-distance trail. Fortunately for me, there is one more long-distance trail that runs through Arizona: the 730-mile Grand Enchantment Trail (GET).

Click map to enlarge

The GET is not an official trail, more of a route that uses existing trails and connects them either with travel on 4wd roads or cross-country travel. It will be a bit more of a navigational challenge than the Arizona Trail, but I found that when I hiked the AZT, I enjoyed the passages that posed a bit of a challenge. This trail was conceived and is maintained by only one person- Brett Tucker aka Blisterfree. He has put together a wonderful route and a really detailed website http://www.simblissity.net/get-home.shtml. You could lose yourself for hours and hours (I know I have) looking at all the pictures, videos, and route descriptions. This picture in the Santa Teresa Wilderness always gets me:

Holdout Canyon- Photo by Brett Tucker

I will be starting to hike sections of the Grand Enchantment Trail in the coming weeks, and the feelings of anticipation and excitement at starting a new long-distance trail are almost too much to bear. This is the feeling I was missing when I finished the Arizona Trail. I love all the planning- looking at maps, deciding what the best time of year is to do the different passages, setting up shuttles, poring over the water chart- good times!

The route of the Grand Enchantment Trail actually uses the Arizona Trail for 70 miles between Roger’s Trough in the Superstitions and Antelope Peak north of Oracle. This means that I have a 70-mile headstart, so I “only” have 660 miles to go…

Wildflower bloom on the Big Hill AZT/GET- See, I already have pictures!

I will be doing 2-4 day segments, similar to what I did on the Arizona Trail. Logistics will become increasingly difficult the farther away I get from my house, but it will be a little while until I have to worry about that. (My dad, who helped me a lot with shuttles on the AZT, was all excited at the prospect of being able to come out from Chicago and help me again.) Quite a bit of the trail is within 3 hours of my house. Thanks Brett!

When I hiked the Arizona Trail, I did it as a fundraiser to benefit the National Fibromyalgia Association. It was a bit of extra work, but I really enjoyed seeing how generous people can be. I am excited to announce that for my Grand Enchantment Trail hike, I will be hiking to benefit Wildlife Rehabilitation in Northwest Tucson, run by Janet and Lewis Miller. The Millers have run the center out of their house for 15 years, and pay for everything out of their pocket, at a cost of over $10,000 a year. They rely on a dedicated group of volunteers and get small donations from time to time from individuals who drop animals off. I have been volunteering with them since June, and it is a really rewarding experience. They deal with mostly birds of all sizes, from hummingbirds to hawks, but they also get skunks, squirrels, rabbits, bats and other mammals that need rehabilitation. One of my favorite animals that spent some time at the Miller’s was a pair of baby bobcats, who have since gone on to another facility.

Baby Bobcat

If you’d like to donate to the Wildlife Rehabilitation in Northwest Tucson, you can either donate online by pressing this button:

Or you can send a check made out to: Wildlife Rehabilitation Northwest Tucson to Pima Federal Credit Union  P.O. Box 50267 Tucson, Arizona 85703. Please put GET in the memo, so they know where you heard about their facility.

In my trail updates, I will be including pictures of birds and animals from the Miller’s rehab. Here’s a picture of a young Harris Hawk that came in this summer. He is slated to be released this spring, when there’s more prey available in the area.

Baby Harris Hawk

The same hawk, a couple weeks later

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I had hoped to end the year with one last big hike. But as I was getting my hiking gear together, I heard moans and groans coming from the bedroom. My husband, Brian, was really sick. I couldn’t leave him alone all day as sick as he was, so instead I stayed home and tended to him. Rather than a triplog from my latest hike, I thought for this entry I would instead take the time to reflect on my past year in hiking:

And what a year it has been. At the beginning of the year, I was still hurting from a fall I took in the Four Peaks that wrenched my knee. After that healed, I climbed Baboquivari, my first mountain requiring climbing gear, in March. I don’t think I have ever been so scared and so elated at the same time. It was my first outdoor climb; I had previously only climbed in the gym. I was really lucky to have such a great group, led by Dave Baker, to encourage me up the mountain. Here’s a great shot Dave got of me on the second climbing pitch. Read my journal from that day here.

Babo 2nd Pitch

The day after my Babo climb, I resumed my section hike on the Arizona Trail to finish out the remaining 200 miles. I hiked from Superior to Pine and cleaned up some areas I had skipped the previous year. My dad came out from Chicago one last time to shuttle me around and provide support for the last leg of my hike.

Looking down at the East Verde River

I did an alternate route on the AZT Passage 37 to get from Grandview Fire Tower to the South Kaibab Trail in the Grand Canyon. As a result, I got to spend five days in the Canyon hiking the SK to Grandview on the Tonto Trail, instead of 23 miles through ponderosa pines with no views. It was my first taste of travel outside the corridor trails- I am hooked!

Pools in Grapevine Canyon

I left the passage near Oracle for last so that friends of mine could hike the final 9 miles with me. The final 9 miles were hiked on Fibromyalgia Awareness Day, May 12. It was a fitting end to my 800-mile hike to raise awareness for Fibromyalgia, a chronic pain condition that I have had for 13 years. There was a group of eight hikers, including my non-hiking husband, for the final miles. Champagne and strawberries were enjoyed at the American Flag Trailhead. Almost two years to the day before, I had gone on a hike up the Cody Trail and looked at the big, metal Arizona Trail sign and wondered, “Maybe I could do some of this Arizona Trail- I wonder what the logistics are?” That question led to nine months of planning, and 13 months of hiking, piece by piece, until I accomplished my goal. What a feeling!

Finishing the 800-mile Arizona Trail at American Flag TH in Oracle

Great highs are often accompanied by a lull, which is what I felt like my summer was. I had finished my big goal, and it is way too hot to hike in most areas of Tucson in the summertime. So I spent the summer trying to get a respite from the heat and stay active while avoiding getting hit by monsoon storms. I went on one memorable camping trip to the Pinalenos, to escape the heat and scout the Grand Enchantment Trail in the area. The Grand Enchantment Trail goes 700 miles from Phoenix to Albuquerque, and is my next big trail that I plan on section hiking. You can find more info about the GET at www.simblissity.net.  I also stayed active this summer by going on night hikes, which yielded many rattlesnake encounters, but made for some great pictures:

Tiger Rattlesnake

This summer, I started volunteering at the Wildlife Rehab Center, which has been an amazing experience. We mostly have birds of all sizes- from hummingbirds to Harris Hawks. We occasionally get mammals as well; I have seen skunks, squirrels, and even bobcats. What a treat to be able to see these animals and birds up close! Here’s a picture of one of my favorite current residents, a young roadrunner that I have fed since he was hatched. He will eventually become an educational animal, because it wouldn’t do to have him hopping up on people’s shoulders and begging for food in the wild…

Juvenile Roadrunner

The lull of the summer ended with the Arizona Trail Association’s yearly Rendezvous in Mormon Lake at the end of September. I was invited to be the speaker for the first evening, and I really enjoyed being able to share my journey with a room of AZT enthusiasts. I spent a week in the Flagstaff area, and got to hike the Humphreys Summit Trail to the highest point in Arizona at 12,637 ft. I explored the Inner Basin as well.

AZ Highpoint

I also returned to one of my favorite places on the Arizona Trail, multicolored sandstone cliffs north of Marshall Lake. To get to these cliffs, take the Sandy Saddle trail from Canyon View Campground to the Arizona Trail and go south.

One of my all-time favorite places

After the Rendezvous and hiking in Flagstaff, I hiked down to the Trail Crew Bunkhouse at the Grand Canyon to do a week’s worth of volunteer work with the Grand Canyon Hikers and Backpackers Association cleaning up the area near the Bright Angel Campground and Phantom Ranch. What a wonderful experience! The group from the GCHBA was a friendly, hardworking bunch, and the 12 of us got along very well for having to all sleep in one house. (I had been worried, because you know what happens on reality TV when you put 12 people in close quarters…)  Waking up each morning on the sleeping porch of the bunkhouse with the Canyon all around was exquisite. Then on my hike out I saw the most unbelievable double rainbow over O’Neill Butte.

Double Rainbow and O'Neill Butte

In October, my brother Shawn came out to visit and my husband and I took him to Las Vegas. While they were gambling, I snuck out to one of my favorite places- the Valley of Fire State Park, about an hour’s drive from the Strip. I spent the day hiking off-trail, exploring the colorful slot canyons and interesting rock formations. The picture on the header of my website is from the Valley of Fire.

Off-trail exploration in the Valley of Fire

In October, I launched this blog, so much of the rest of the year has been documented on this website. December was a quiet month, I rolled my ankle a couple of weeks back and have been taking it easy to let it heal.

I want to end this retrospective by thanking all my readers of this and my Arizona Trail blog. I really enjoy your comments and hope to share many more adventures with you in the upcoming year.

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This October, I was lucky enough to get on a volunteer project organized by the Grand Canyon Hikers and Backpackers Association (GCHBA). I spent one week in the Trail Crew Bunkhouse and we did a variety of maintenance jobs, like cleaning irrigation drainages in the Bright Angel Campground, obliterating social trails on the Boat Beach, and clearing space in the dams in Bright Angel Creek to let the fish get through when they spawn in the spring. I got to do some really fun hikes, like Upper Ribbon Falls and some hiking on the Clear Creek Trail. On October 7th, I reluctantly hiked out on the South Kaibab Trail. It was 80 degrees at the bottom, but by the time I reached Cedar Ridge, the weather turned and I had been hailed on twice. After the second bout of hail, the most spectacular rainbow I have ever seen came out. Here is a video:

Click the picture below to see more pictures from my week at the Grand Canyon:

GCHBA Fall 09

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